Election 2017: GOP Primary Races to Watch in Brick, Toms River

Gavin Rozzi

Gavin Rozzi

Gavin Rozzi is the editor of Ocean County Politics and a lifelong Ocean County resident, residing in Lacey Township. Gavin's work centers on the intersection of money and politics in Ocean County, with a focus on public corruption. He can be reached via email at editor@politicsoc.com or via phone at (848)-667-0840 or on encrypted phone / text app Signal.

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  • guest

    Toms River is in deep Doo Da pertaining to their Ward races IMHO. The blatant dysfunction over the past few years had caught up with them: the recent “shakeup” was long overdue. The family/friends hiring plan within the ranks in town hall, its municipal agencies, divisions have caught up with them.

    • Im Trump the 25 mil fraud

      Is that a bad thing? Because its been like that for years and The Republicons still run TR and most of Ocean County all under the rule of Happy Gilmore
      I find it funny how RepubliCONS hypocrites if you will hire Friends N Family who all have not needed Govt jobs but claim to be for less Govt I know that’s different

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  • guest

    Brick was run by the Republican’s a few years back after the Scarpelli incident. Voila! Toms River has game on with at least a few seat’s up for grabs.

    • patent core

      Alright however your post does not make much hay as one has nothing to do with the other.

  • guest

    Why don’t you read the article that is what she said.

    • Andersen

      The poster was being facetious. I think he was mimicking their closed-door political meetings on what to do. Politics 101.

  • Im Trump the 25 mil fraud

    The prostitutes in Washington want to screw you
    “Republican lawmakers appear to have proposed health insurance for the American people that they don’t consider good enough for themselves – or their staffs.
    As Congressional Republicans revive their efforts to repeal and replace Obamacare, they have included a loophole that would protect legislators and their staffs from weakened protections that could hurt other American insurance buyers, Vox first reported Tuesday night.
    Formally known as the Affordable Care Act, Obamacare included a provision requiring members of Congress and their staffs to buy their coverage on an Obamacare marketplace; they currently get coverage through a Washington, D.C., exchange aimed at small business coverage, where they also get a significant employer contribution from the federal government. Obamacare also established strong protections for people with pre-existing conditions, such as diabetes and depression – preventing consumers from being charged more or denied coverage on an individual marketplace because of their health status.
    Now, in their replacement legislation, Republicans have proposed rolling back these protections on a national level – but have said that those protections must remain in place for themselves and their staffs.
    Critics pounced immediately. “If House Republicans are afraid of TrumpCare for themselves, they have no right to force it on hard-working American families,” House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi said in a statement. The Republican behind the amendment, Rep. Tom MacArthur, vowed later Wednesday to close the loophole, Vox reported.
    One way the House proposal would weaken protections for those with pre-existing conditions is by letting states apply for a waiver that would allow insurers to charge people different premiums based on their health status. Under such a system, someone with metastatic cancer could be charged an additional $142,650 annually in premiums, according to a study by the (liberal-leaning) Center for American Progress, while someone with asthma could be charged an additional $4,340 a year.
    States would also have the option, under the GOP-backed amendment, of establishing high-risk pools for state residents who would otherwise be unable to get coverage. These pools existed before Obamacare, and research showed they often failed to make coverage affordable and accessible.
    It’s not surprising that Congress members seem inclined to avoid premium hikes based on their existing health conditions. In general, the prevalence of pre-existing conditions tends to rise with age – and the average age of U.S. lawmakers has been increasing. The average age of a U.S. Representative is 57 and the average age of a Senator is 61, according to Quorum.
    It remains unclear whether the replacement bill will garner enough votes to pass the House – and whether the exemption will survive the legislative process. “It doesn’t strike me as the most politically savvy provision to include,” says Sabrina Corlette, research professor at the Center on Health Insurance Reforms at the Georgetown University Health Policy Institute”

    WAKE UP